Hungry? Get a Taste of Homewood

On Thursday, March 9 at 5:30 p.m., all of your favorite Homewood eateries will come together for the 16th annual “Taste of Homewood”.

Hosted by the Homewood Chamber of Commerce and presented by the Homewood Star, 30 Homewood restaurants are gathering in Rosewood Hall to provide food and drink samples to the over 400 hungry patrons they expect to host. New restaurants to the vendor lineup include biscuit specialist Holler & Dash, to-go caterer Lunchbox Express and seafood chain The Shrimp Basket.

Each restaurant will give eaters a glimpse into their cuisines, encouraging them to return for a meal and explore other areas of Homewood. Allen Barlow will provide acoustic music for guests to enjoy while dining and socializing.

To encourage socialization, Homewood Chamber of Commerce communications manager Sarah Anne Elliott suggests using the hashtag #tasteofhomewood on social media posts throughout the night.

“This year we are encouraging attendees to use the hashtag #tasteofhomewood to post on social media and be entered to win a Shop Homewood Instagift gift card and the chance for their photo to be featured in the marketing of next year’s event,” Elliott said. Entries will be taken from Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

Tickets are $30 until the day of the event, when they will increase to $40 at the door. The proceeds go to Chamber of Commerce scholarships and Homewood community development. Brings the kids, too! Children under six enter free.

Interested in visiting one of the featured restaurants ahead of time or stopping for a full meal following the event? Click on the map below to explore the locations of your tasty options.

 

A City Divided – A History of the Iron Bowl

Photo by Kate Sullivan

Roll Tide! War Eagle! What may seem like simple words are actually phrases that hold an unexplainable meaning for two very loyal fan bases. Phrases that have become battle cries ringing in the air all year long, sparking both friendships and fights.

In an interview with Charles Barkley for AL.com, University of Alabama football head coach Nick Saban said people who grow up in the state are raised in the football rivalry and it is a part of them. “And they have a lot of passion and they don’t have a lot of other choices. There’s not an NFL team, there’s not an NBA basketball team. So, everybody relates to one of these two schools and there’s a lot of passion for it.”

Alabama and Auburn fans wait all year long for that one day when their teams take the field against each other. The whole state of Alabama turns its attention to the game, and the neutral neighbors of these rabid fans are forced to pick a side. That day is known as The Iron Bowl.

The Iron Bowl gets its name from its Birmingham ties, as the city was the location of the game for 53 seasons, including the first. The programs met in 1893 in Lakeview Park for the first time ever in front of a crowd of about 5,000 strong. Drama ensued from the start as there were arguments as to whether the game should count for the 1892 or 1893 season. Word of the two teams playing and the subsequent tension drew interest as people began to discover the sport of football.

As Auburn was enjoying early success, threats from the university almost put an end to Alabama’s growing program. The dangers of football as well as the cost associated with funding a whole football team, had the University of Alabama’s faculty questioning the need for such a sport at the collegiate level.

Luckily for the Crimson Tide, football would be preserved and the yearly game against the Tigers would resume, that is until 1907 when the series was put on hold for financial discrepancies between the two teams.

Forty years later, the battle was reinstated after the Alabama House of Representatives brought forth a resolution to resume the rivalry by implementing full athletic programs for both schools. The state legislature went one step forward by threatening to withhold funding for the two universities unless they agreed to bring the Iron Bowl back.

The game was to return to Birmingham where the largest stadium in the state, Legion Field was located. By the time the game was officially moved to be played at each team’s respective fields in 1998, the game had earned its title of “The Iron Bowl” due to the city’s rich iron history.

While Birmingham may no longer play host to the most heated rivalry in all of college football, the roots of the teams run deep throughout the city with a plethora of both Alabama and Auburn fans as residents. It is easy to assume that almost everyone in the city has a side with which they align themselves in the series. However, this doesn’t always hold true.

In 2011 the Capital Survey Research Center in Montgomery surveyed throughout the state to see which team they pulled for. Of those surveyed, 37 percent identified themselves as Alabama fans and 18 percent said they cheer for Auburn, but 20 percent said they cheer for both teams and 22 percent said they cheer for neither.

Essentially, 42 percent of the polled population said they don’t care which team wins.

Birmingham is growing and with that growth comes new waves of people who don’t have a background with either team. Regardless of their football preferences though, new residents often find themselves in a bizarre situation of having to choose a team, either by coworkers, neighbors, friends or significant others.

Kasey Mack, a college student in Birmingham, found herself having to choose sides despite her background as a University of Georgia fan. “I moved to Birmingham for school and all of a sudden I was surrounded by all these Alabama and Auburn fans who wanted to know not what my team was, but whether I cheered for Alabama or Auburn. It was like they weren’t satisfied with my response of not really caring between the two.”

Mack said as a Georgia fan she was raised to hate Auburn because they were one of Georgia’s rivals, thus she found herself cheering for Alabama when the Iron Bowl rolled around. Ultimately, she was just watching the game as a fan of football as opposed to a fan of either team. Her Bama fandom was solidified when she began dating an Alabama graduate.

“Yeah, I pretty much have to root for Alabama now. When he found out I didn’t really care which team won, he looked at me like I had two heads. I’m still a Georgia fan at the end of the day, but I find myself saying ‘Roll Tide’ a lot more often now.”

A Birmingham Fall as told by Pinterest

Check out our Pinterest board for great ideas on where and how to spend your November days in Birmingham and surrounding areas!

http://pin.it/NnElbTG

Local Coffee Shops Transformed into Popular Fictional Diner

To celebrate the 16th anniversary of the first episode of Gilmore Girls, Birmingham coffee shops partnered with Netflix on October 6 and converted into the hit show’s own coffee shop, Luke’s Diner.  Lucy’s Coffee and Tea, Crestwood Coffee Co. and The Abbey were three of the 200 cafes around the country that participated in the pop up.

The pop-ups were open from 7 a.m. to noon, and the first 200 guest received free coffee. The shops included décor from the show, such as Luke’s signs, aprons, backward caps, and coffee cups covered in Gilmore Girls quotes. Even the staff at the shops wore Luke’s Diner branded aprons and T-shirts. Netflix also announced a new season which is to premiere around Thanksgiving time.  

Lucy’s, a coffee shop located on University Blvd, was thrilled to be one of the Netflix-sponsored coffee shops. Early on, the line wrapped around the block as Gilmore Girls fans excitingly waited for their free cup of coffee. The coffee shops said that social media was a big factor in whether or not a café was chosen to host a Luke’s diner pop-up.

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Coffee sleeves were adorned with Luke’s logo
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A line of fans awaiting their coffee
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Employees dressed up as characters for the occasion

  

It’s Relay For Life Time

Homewood — It’s here again! The Homewood community is gathering Friday, April 22 between 4p.m. and 11p.m. at Homewood’s Central Park for this year’s American Cancer Society Relay For Life of Homewood event.

 

Involved in this common effort to “create a world with less cancer and more birthdays” are organizations such as Samford Greek Life, Hall Kent Elementary, Edgewood Elementary, Shades Cahaba Elementary, Homewood High School and Southern Nuclear.

 

Supported greatly by volunteers, the event will feature performances from HHS Cheerleaders, Edgewood Kids Choir, HMS Patriot Singers, Homewood Jazz Band and HMS Trendsetters—to mention a few!

 

To accompany these treats are an ice cream eating contest and an inflatable slide.

 

“Our Relay for Life event,” Relay For Life Specialist Christina Zabala wrote in a press release, “supports the mission of the American Cancer Society to save lives by helping people stay well, by helping people get well, by finding cures and by fighting back against the disease.”

 

Readers are invited to join in this community celebration of the lives impacted by, lost to and reclaimed from cancer.

 

Readers interested in participating in this year’s Relay For Life event as a volunteer or team member may contact Zabala at 205-930-8868 or visit www.RelayForLife.org/HomewoodAL.

Track and field competes at South Alabama

Eight Samford University track and field athletes earned top-three finishes at the South Alabama Invitational, held Thursday, April 14 through Saturday, April 16.

The high-performing contingent was headlined by first-place showings from Sarah Sanford, Courtney Prengaman and Javion Lee.

Sanford won the women’s 400-meter hurdles in 59.76 seconds; Prengaman won the women’s high jump with a clearance of 1.69 meters; and Lee won the men’s triple jump with a leap of 15.04 meters.

Men’s pole vaulter Tray Oates and men’s long jumper Marquis Barnes claimed runner-up finishes in their respective events. Notably, Oates’ clearance of 5.32 meters set a new school record.

Jay Vines (400 hurdles), Chris Thrasher (javelin) and Tonia McKinley (100 meters) posted third-place performances to round out Samford’s top finishers.

The teams will look to carry their momentum into the coming weekend, when they’re slated to compete at the Auburn Invitational.

Birmingham Barons Opener

The Birmingham Barons had a rough season opener, losing to the Jacksonville Suns 6-1 last Thursday.

The team played the opener in Jacksonville and stayed the weekend, playing five games in all. The Barons won one of the five games against the Suns.

The Suns, with a 57-81 record for the 2015 season, proved to be too much for the Barons’ opening game.

The Suns scored the first point, and the Barons’ first baseman, Jake Peter, had a home-run in the second inning. This was Peter’s first professional baseball game.

The teams remained tied 1-1 until J.T. Riddle of the Suns had a three-run home run in the third inning. The next inning was scoreless, and in the fifth inning the Suns gained the last game point.

They will play their first home game tonight, against the Tennessee Smokies. First pitch will be thrown at 7:05 p.m. For ticketing information, call (205) 988-3200.

Pepper Place is Back

Birmingham’s favorite farmers market is back on Saturday, April 9th. It is open from 7 a.m. to noon rain or shine.

Pepper Place began in 2000 in provide a connection between family farmers and the people of Birmingham, Alabama. Since then is has grown from a few tents to over 100 tents spread across parking lots and streets around Pepper Place. The market has hosted around 10,000 people every Saturday at the height of the season.

All of the vendors are based in Alabama and are the actual growers, joined by their family members and friends.

Shoppers can expect bedding plants, herbs, lettuces, asparagus, and strawberries to be in season for the spring and as it gets closer to summer blackberries, blueberries, peaches and mushrooms. Alongside of the fresh produce market goers can find bakers and cooks who serve food to eat and take home, from breakfast food to dessert. As well as food, Pepper Place hosts Alabama artists, artisans and craftspeople with unique items to decorate with or give as a gift.

The address is:
2829 2nd Avenue South
Birmingham, Alabama 35233

A list of vendors can be found here:

http://www.pepperplacemarket.com/vendors/

Nitty Gritty Magic City Reading Series

The Nitty Gritty Magic City Reading Series is a reading, writing, and performance event held at The Desert Island Supply Co. in Birmingham, Alabama. They generally feature at least one of Birmingham’s working writers. For the month of April, they are hosting three out-of-towners: Michael Robins, Adam Clay and Ada Limón.

All three are incredible poets. Lion’s latest book, Bright Dead Things, was recently a finalist for the National Book Award.

The event is happening Sunday, April 10th at 3:30 p.m. at Desert Island Supply Co. in Woodlawn. The address is: 5500 1st Ave N, Birmingham, AL 35212.

Fore more information:

http://www.desertislandsupplyco.com/

http://www.facebook.com/nittygrittymagiccity/