String Theory

An unconventional & groove-worthy ensemble

A musician guides his bow across the strings of a cello. He is tucked away behind a conductor stand, embracing the cello as if it is a beloved friend. Just a few measures into the song, he thrusts the bow with vigor. The instrument delivers a melody reminiscent of “Bohemian Rhapsody,” Queen’s chart-topping, pop-rock anthem. Have your ears deceived you, or is a conservatoire-trained musician performing rock ‘n’ roll hits on a cello?

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Kara Young: a singer who doesn’t want to be famous

KaraYoungCDAlbum

Kara Young poses for her new CD cover.

She has been singing for years and recently debuted her new CD, yet Kara Young has no desire to become famous.

Growing up in a family that sings together as a hobby, Young has always considered music to be part of her life. “I always tell people I started singing in the womb, but I really don’t remember the exact time I started singing,” Young said.

She began taking guitar lessons in eighth grade and was soon asked to lead worship for an event in her hometown of Tupelo, Miss. “I definitely loved the Lord and I loved music, so it made sense, but I didn’t really know what I was doing at first,” Young said.

However, that changed the summer before her tenth grade year of high school when she was asked to lead worship regularly for her church youth group. “I felt very inadequate,” she said. Recognizing that it was much more than simply singing, she thought other people had more talents than she did and would be better equipped.

“Knowing how to follow the Spirit and lead a congregation is so much more than performing a concert,” Young said. Even with all of these doubts, she felt called to lead and told her youth pastor, “I don’t want to, but I will.” Since then, multiple doors have opened and Young has been given the opportunity to sing for thousands of people.

During her senior year of high school she debuted an EP called “Take A Stand” with five original songs and one hymn. In the fall of 2013 she released her first full-length album titled “Familiarity”, which she describes as chapter two of her story. The songs on her new album follow her journey as she leaves home, begins life as a student at Samford University, struggles with picking a major and each new season that comes along the way.

Although she now has two CDs out and leads worship regularly, her goal has remained the same through the entire process.

“Ultimately, my goal is not to be a famous Christian singer,” Young said. “My goal is not to be well-known.” Instead, her “main goal is to open my heart and use the light of Jesus and allow myself to be a vessel for Him to reach others and lead others to a state of worship through the gifts He has given me.”

As she continues to take opportunities to sing, her mind-set remains that her talent is a gift. “It’s not about performing and it’s not about the songs and the vocals. He gave me a heart and a passion for leading the Body of Christ in a state of worship through the gift of music.”

Young currently works at a church in Birmingham by leading retreats and worship services on the weekend. She founded Let It Shine Ministries and continues to write and sing music while working through her ministry.

Kara Young’s music is available on iTunes and CDBaby. To keep up with her, visit her Facebook page.

By Kaitlyn Bouchillon

Photography by Elizabeth Bacon

Jeremy Moore: Up and Coming

The passion, piercing lyrics and haunting melodies coming from Jeremy Moore make Birmingham proud to claim him as a native. Moore, a recent Samford graduate, grew up in Birmingham as a worship pastor’s kid—a “PK” as some call it.

Moore led worship for church services and Disciple Now weekends for years, honing his skills on drums, guitar and piano. Although he never anticipated a solo career, Moore went to Samford for classical music training to serve as a basis for his musicianship. Moore believes, “If you don’t know where you come from musically, you don’t know where you can go musically.”

With an ever-developing style that delights the ears, Moore’s music ranges from rock to blues, yet his lyrics primarily revolve around relationships. “I want people listening to my music to have something they can fall back on to that connects to their emotion at that moment and helps them realize either a greater truth or a deeper meaning. If someone listens to one of my breakup song after a break up, I see that as the highest compliment.”

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The main priority in Moore’s life is his faith. As the Music Associate at Briarwood Presbyterian Church, he is able to use his musical gifts on a weekly basis. Moore experiences the tension between the Christian and secular music industry as many others do, however, Moore thinks that faith and music are intended to intertwine. “I think they can play a vital part in the struggle and in the content you write about. You’re asking hard questions but at the end of the day you come back to the realization that God is sovereign and He’s always going to be something you can rely on no matter what.”

Jeremy Moore is an aspiring Birmingham-renowned musician. After releasing his Perfect Mold EP in May 2013, Moore started to play at open mic nights and music competitions around Birmingham. He recently won Moonlight on the Mountain, which led to a radio spot on Birmingham Mountain Radio and the production of an upcoming EP with Higher Ground Studios.

You can download Moore’s Perfect Mold EP on iTunes or support him by “liking” www.facebook.com/jeremymooremusic

By Eleanor Stenner
Photography by Eleanor Stenner

stacked records

Renaissance Records

Story and photos by Leah Jane Henderson

stacked records

It’s not easy to find a great record store with classic albums or one-of-a-kind finds.

Whether it’s a 33 r.p.m., a 45 or an 8-track, Renaissance Records in Five Points South is a haven for music lovers and collectors alike.

The store specializes in vintage records but has a modest number of new artists and albums. New and used books, CDs, records, and movies are also sold for great prices, as well as posters and art.

Gary Bourgeois (pronounced Boo-schwah) is the middleman between music and the ears of listeners, bringing great taste in records and a love for his store. An English professor at Miles College, Gary finds the time to run his store in the afternoons and weekends.

When you first step through the door, you’ll hear the jangling of a worn doorknob, vintage records crackling over speakers and the rugged sound of vinyl, old French ballads, Jim Morrison’s crooning voice, or Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon. Red walls are plastered with psychedelic album art and classic movie posters, autographs and postcards.

Renaissance Records is a haven for music lovers and collectors alike.

A glossy, gold phonograph sits on one of many bookshelves filled with cassette tapes and jaded, valuable magazines. String lights cloak the huge front window, accompanied by soft, worn-in couches and glowing lamps on piles of thick, musty books. These are the sights and sounds of visiting one of the oldest record stores in Birmingham.

Ambition was running through Gary’s veins in 2003 when he decided to open Renaissance Records located at 2020 11th Ave. South.

“This used to be a bookstore kind of an alternative, new age bookstore. I used to work at Charlemagne (Records) back in the older days and then I started teaching in 2000 at Miles. But after a few years I missed working at Charlemagne and thought this was the perfect place and remodeled it and now we have a little of everything.”

He got the idea to open while visiting Europe after his French professor in college encouraged him to go to France.

Owner Gary Bourgeois holds up one of his favorite records

“That’s where I came up with the idea. In France they have all these shops, and in London and Amsterdam, there are all these cool shops like coffee shops, offbeat shops, bookstores, record stores, everything. That’s when it clicked in my mind, this is perfect, I’m going to make it happen.”

Bourgeois’ favorite part about running the store is meeting people, “There’s a social element when you work in a record store. Of course, I love trading records, it’s really fun and I love playing records. When you put a record on it sounds so great. it sounds 10 times better. But you get to meet all these people.”

Many people visit the store, from a handful of locals who come in every week to browse and catch up on conversation, to musicians and bands, to complete strangers whose fingers itch for the feeling of slick vinyl, to feel the spiral grooves of a 45.

The store specialized in vintage records, but has a modest number of new ones as well.

“In an urban city and area like this you’ve got crazies that come through and really eccentric characters, a real mix with collegestudents, older collectors, younger collectors, and families. It’s like a soap opera. You’ve got the regulars and the skateboard kids coming down, and we’ve even had the guy from KISS, Gene Simmons, standing in here. Who knows who you’re going to meet? From one day to the next, you have no clue.”

He compares his job to the film High Fidelity starring John Cusack, “It’s a must-read and a must-see film. John Cusack is like me, trying to pay the bills, which is my least favorite thing to do. It’s the greatest book and movie. Actually that’s our training manual. Whenever someone wants to work here we make them take the VHS or DVD and watch it, and after they’ve watched it we say okay, now you might be ready.”