Q&A with Sarah McFarland, Alpha Omicron Pi’s President

Samford University is home to six panhellenic sororities, one of which is Alpha Omicron Pi. The sorority is lead by an executive council that strives to make the chapter the absolute best it can be. Sarah McFarland, a junior accounting major from St. Louis, Missouri, has been the chapter president of Samford’s AOII for the past few months. Although McFarland enjoys binging shows on Netflix, hanging out with friends and eating far too many scoops of Edgewood Creamery icecream most of her time is spent serving with and for her fellow sisters. I got the chance to sit down her McFarland and ask her about her experience serving in such a crucial role and being a full time student.

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Q&A with Ashley Steiner of Ashley Ink & Paperie

Meet Ashley Steiner, a junior at Samford University in Birmingham by way of Overland Park, Kansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas and Milton, Georgia. Steiner is a business major and actively puts her college studies to practice when running her own company, Ashley Ink & Paperie. Ashley Ink & Paperie prides itself with its faith based roots and offers a variety of products including: note cards, prints, custom stationery, invitations, calendars, and planners with handmade illustrations. When Ashley isn’t drawing or making , Ashley can be found sitting in a local coffee shop and engaging her local community. I asked Ashley a few questions about what it’s like running her own company while also balancing being a full time student. Ashley Ink & Paperie’s mission statement is rooted in Psalm 138:3, “He made me bold by strengthening my soul.”  I had the chance to ask Ashley some questions about her experience running her own company and being a full time college student. 

How long have you been running your own company and 

how did you initially get into it?

I started Ashley Ink & Paperie in 2013 right before my junior year of high school. I have had a passion for drawing ever since I was a little girl. I could always be found making greeting cards for friends and family, but I never knew this hobby could turn into a business! During my sophomore year of high school, one of my classes assigned an independent study project. My mom gave me the idea for the project to research how to create my drawings into notecards and prints instead of giving away the original copies. My research evolved into how to start a business and it became something I really wanted to do! In August 2013 before my junior year of high school, I officially launched Ashley Ink, which grew into Ashley Ink & Paperie in 2016. In October 2013 I sold my first wholesale order to a retail store, and in November 2013 I opened the Etsy shop.

Why stationery/paper products?

Growing up, I always made greeting cards to give family for holidays and special occasions. My friends started noticing and wanting cards too, so I decided to make copies instead of giving away the originals! I believe there is so much power behind the simplicity of a handwritten note. In a world so driven by technology today, sending a tangible message is even more important. As my company has grown, notecards and stationery are just a portion of the products. Prints, calendars, and planners are also popular among customers.

Have you ever considered making other products, say (for example) t-shirts, posters, phone cases, etc.

Yes! I am currently in the process of expanding product lines…more information to come on that soon! 🙂

Is there anything else to Ashley Ink & Paperie besides your products?

Ashley Ink & Paperie has a blog at ashleyinkandpaperie.com. Besides selling online, the company wholesales to stores in various states around the country and participates in local markets. I have presented my company in a few business competitions with Entrepreneur Organization’s Global Student Entrepreneur Awards, and Region’s New Venture Challenge. I was so surprised and blessed to have won both competitions last year! My company also sponsors Samford Zeta Tau Alpha by creating promotional materials for chapter events and philanthropy.

How do you balance managing your company and being a full time student?

Balancing life, school, and a business is honestly a lot like organized chaos sometimes, but I wouldn’t change it for anything! Holidays, summer, in between classes, and weekends are the major times I work on Ashley Ink & Paperie. Being a business major has been such a blessing (even though it’s hard!!) because the business school has been an incredible support for my company. I’ve been given incredible opportunities such as competing in business competitions and having an overflow of resources to learn and grow as a business owner. I’m a member of the Incubator Program for startup companies – which means I have access to mentors and an office space in the business building. I’m trying to come up with some good answer on how it all works together, but honestly, I know it’s not my own doing! There’s no other way to explain it – the Lord has been so faithful in leading me through this busy season of juggling school with owning a company.

How have you seen your company and/or products change since being a student? Has it even changed?

My goal as an artist and business owner is to never stop improving my artistic style. Since I have been at Samford, I have found so much inspiration that has greatly evolved my product lines. I have also traveled to lots of different places throughout college, all of which have inspired new work and products! My business classes have definitely helped improve the business side of operating my company and have sparked ideas for growth.

What’s the most rewarding aspect of being the single mind behind your business?

There are lots of rewards at the end of the day that stretch far beyond any challenge I face as a business owner. However, I must admit that I am not the only mind behind my company. I’m an entrepreneur and artist at heart, but there’s no way I could do it all alone! My friends and family-specifically my mom who works with me-are my biggest helpers and supporters.

There’s nothing quite like meeting a customer for the first time and watching them find joy in something as simple as a notecard. It’s a feeling I cannot describe, but it gives so much reassurance in what I’m doing! I find so much joy in someone recognizing my notecards in O’Henrys or picking up a calendar from the Samford Bookstore. It’s the little things! My company is the channel through which I’m able to use the gifts I’ve been given in a tangible form, so I love waking up and being able to do that everyday!

How do you engage the community with your designs?

Social media is the major platform and means for communication with customers. Instagram by far has the most engagement, and it has been a fun way to connect with customers! I love creating local-themed artwork as well. It connects with customers on a home team level, and some of these local products are the most popular! Getting out and meeting customers the good ole-fashioned way through markets is also a fun way to engage the community.

Has there ever been a moment when you’ve considered discontinuing your business?

Oh, definitely. There are always unforeseen bends in the road and times that I’ve wondered if all the work is worth it…but then I remember why I started my company. Its purpose is so much greater than any story I can tell myself, and its calling comes from gifts and passion the Lord has placed in my life. In challenging moments, I’m reminded that I can’t rely on my own strength to succeed. What a relief! It makes me think about one day last summer when I had a booth at a local art festival. I was so excited to be there, but the weather had other plans. A massive gust of wind and pop-up downpour carried my booth’s tent down the street! Yikes. Oh well. I learned that it’s okay for business things to not always work out the way I expect–sometimes you win, and sometimes you get wet! Through every hard time, the things I have learned in the end help shape me and my company even more.

What do you hope to see for the future of your company some day?

I am so excited for the future of my company! There are lots of fun things in the works as it evolves into a lifestyle company. More to come on all of that soon!

 

For more information about Ashley and her products…

Etsy shop: ashleyink.etsy.com

Blog: ashleyinkandpaperie.com

“Coffee-coffee-coffee, is a saying. It’s a funny, desperate cry for caffeine.”

Here in Birmingham, coffee seems to run through the city’s veins like it runs through the fictional veins of Lorelai Gilmore. If you’re looking for a place to study, catch up with a friend, or fuel your day, we’ve got you covered. Here are five unique coffee shops in Birmingham, AL.

1. seeds coffee company, 174 Oxmoor Rd, Birmingham, AL 35209

Seeds is has an industrial-rustic chic and laid-back atmosphere that’s always buzzing with studious college students and twenty-somethings.

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Three Inexpensive Nights Out In Birmingham

You deserve a night out. If you are a college student like me, you are probably juggling six or more classes, an internship for academic credit and a paid full-time job just to pay your rent. Because of all these things, you have the right to treat yourself every once and a while. The issue often tends to be that, though you may want a night out, you cannot afford to spend a lot of money. That is where I come in. Having lived in the city of Birmingham my whole life, I knew quite a few spots that can help you save a few bucks while enjoying what the city has to offer. Here is a short list of three different locations in Birmingham on the cheap. You can find directions to each location by clicking on the venue name in the list.

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Q&A with Harrison Tarabella

One of the best parts of my Samford experience has been all the creative people I’ve met during my four years here. One such example is Harrison Tarabella: a talented visual artist who got his initial training from professional National Geographic photographer. I sat down with Harrison to talk about where his passion comes from, his favorite experiences thus far and what’s next for him.

Answers have been edited for content and clarity.

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The dreams of the homecoming queen

Rachel Gregory Princess

Homecoming Queen Rachel Gregory with young girl.

After four years at Samford University, Rachel Gregory will graduate with more than just memories – she’ll graduate with a crown.

Crowned homecoming queen for the 2013 to 2014 school year, Gregory was excited and honored, adding the event to her list of favorite Samford memories.

Other moments that made the list include playing on several intramural teams, participating in Step Sing, joining Alpha Delta Pi and leading a small group.

“I lead an incredible group of freshman girls who encourage me and challenge me daily in my walk with Christ,” Gregory said.

Extremely involved on campus, Gregory has not only led a small group but has been the chaplain for her sorority, served as a Rho Gamma and a Connections Leader and was involved with the Student Government Association.  As a freshman, Gregory competed in the SoCon Track and Field Indoor Championship and jumped her personal best in the pole vault.

Although she has accomplished many things in her time at Samford, Gregory has several dreams for the future.

“I dream of being used in supernatural ways to bring the gospel of Jesus Christ to this earth,” Gregory said. “Most of my dreams kind of scare me, but maybe that’s because I cannot attain them on my own. I have to trust that God will provide me with opportunities and that He will equip me emotionally, spiritually, and physically to accomplish the dreams He has placed in my heart.”

She has more serious dreams like living overseas or going to seminary for a degree in Christian Education, but she also has dreams of entering a swing dancing competition and working as Belle at Disney World.

As an elementary education major, one of her biggest dreams is to teach in an international school. After graduation she will be certified to teach children in grades PreK – 6 and special education. She hopes to use her teaching degree as a means of ministry and aspires to be like Mrs. Robbins, her fourth grade teacher.

“She loved me so well and inspired me to want to be a teacher just like her. Since fourth grade, I have always had my heart set on being a teacher just like Mrs. Robbins,” Gregory said.

Already making an impact not only on Samford’s campus but in the lives of children, one of Gregory’s most recent favorite Samford memories happened during Homecoming weekend.

“After being crowned Homecoming Queen,” Gregory said, “a little girl asked, ‘Are you a real princess?’ I told her yes and asked if she was a princess, too.” When the little girl responded “Yes,” Gregory asked if she would like to try on the crown. “I gingerly placed it on her head,” she said. “She then ran over to her dad shouting, “Daddy! Daddy! I just met Miss Alabama!”

With a long list of Samford memories and accomplishments, Gregory has enjoyed her years at Samford. She said that her achievements have been by the grace of God and trusts Him to lead her toward her dreams. The recent addition of a crown is just a bonus among many wonderful college memories.

By Kaitlyn Bouchillon

Crestline Village: The Mayberry of Birmingham

Tucked between the peaceful streets of Crestline Heights and the sprawling greens of the Birmingham Country Club is a home away from home — a village of shops, restaurants and city buildings. Crestline Village is its own little town just miles away from the big city.

Nestled in the heart of Mountain Brook the community of Crestline Village is a present-day Mayberry. Crestline offers both residents and visitors a retreat from the busyness of city life and reminds the Birmingham area that neighborly values mean much more than just a friendly face or welcoming smile. The sense of community runs deep through the shop owners, restaurant managers and city workers.

When talking about Crestline Village, the Mountain Brook Chamber of Commerce says it best: “Welcome to Crestline Village. Welcome to family.”

Every family is unique and Crestline is no different. The old brick buildings bleed history, begging visitors to slow down and enjoy the moment. From the one-of-a-kind boutiques to the modern library and the mom-and-pop pharmacy, the village offers something for everyone.

The warm atmosphere that immediately sets visitors and tourists at ease also provides a respite for locals. It’s common to see local families having a picnic in the grassy area beside the Emmet O’Neal Library, playing a game with the kid-size chess set next to City Hall or enjoying a warm cup of coffee while sitting in Church Street Coffee & Books.

One reason that both locals and visitors feel right at home is because of the camaraderie between Crestline shop and restaurant owners. Instead of trying to beat out one another, the owners speak highly of each other and even plan events together.

Natalie Babington is the manager of Snap Kids, a children’s clothing store that features comfortable and stylish clothing for all ages, from newborn to kid’s sizes to tween. “All of the shop owners and managers get along great. We always are helping each other out. We plan sales together and things like that because we want to make sure we can maximize who we reach with our sales,” Babington said.

Instead of acting as a competitor, Snap Kids often works with their neighbor Snoozy’s Kids, which has everything from toys and baby blankets to jewelry for mom.

The owner of Snoozy’s Kids, George Jones, has owned the store since 1988 and has seen kids as customers come back in years later with their own children.

“I’ve been able to retain my customers as they go through the teen years and graduation gifts. There are grandmothers who came here to buy things for their children and now they’re buying for their grandchildren,” Jones said.

One of Crestline’s unique qualities is that many of the shop owners live close by are neighbors. Jones lives in Crestline and explains that while he has a fenced-in yard, there is a gate on each side of his yard leading to his neighbors’ yards. The sense of community that permeates Crestline Village is direct evidence of the community that surrounds the village.

“We’re made up of small stores, small boutiques and small business people. A lot of us live around here, so you live in your community,” Jones said. “You work in your community, and that can’t help but make even more of a sense of community. When someone comes in and you show them a gift and you know their child, you know who they’re buying for. It’s kind of Mayberry-ish.”

It’s easy to see the plus side of living in such tight-knit community, and it’s understandable that locals don’t feel a need to move anywhere else. “We have everything from a library and city hall to the police station and a grocery store. Children’s clothes, ladies’ clothes, if you’re planning a wedding or need a photograph, drugs, or a bakery, it’s all right here,” Jones said.

Newcomers to Crestline also agree: there’s no place quite like Crestline Village, where everyone knows your name.

Alex Stone grew up in Crestline, but her store, The Pantry, was located in Cahaba Heights until recently. Now that she’s moved “home,” Stone sees a steady stream of regular customers every day. “We love it here; it’s real homely,” Stone said. “Everybody knows everybody.”

The Pantry — a health-conscious, farmstead lifestyle store in Crestline Village — places an extreme importance on the quality of food. The store is also event driven, hosting wine and cheese events and gumbo and beer night every Friday.

While Stone runs The Pantry, her mother, Deborah Stone, runs the farm that provides the restaurant with its fresh products. Deborah Stone grew up on a farm before opening one of the first day spas in America, and she couldn’t be happier to finally be back on the farm. In a way, opening The Pantry has brought both mother and daughter back home.

Because The Pantry has its own farm, many of the items sold in the restaurant are homemade. They offer everything from jams and jellies to 12 different flavors of cheese made from one of their 150 goats. The Pantry restaurant truly begins at the farm.

There’s a grab-and-go section full of soups, casseroles and tomato pies that are perfect for busy parents to pick up and pop in the oven when they get home from work. There are several juices and even cow’s milk straight from the farm — courtesy of Poppy the cow.

Looking to appeal to all generations, The Pantry also has Steel City Pops available and many different health juices. In fact, The Pantry provides the milk for both the caramel and the tomatillo pop. Between the food, pops and juicing, they’ve figured out how to gain a wide customer base.

“The juicing brings in the teenage crowd and the health-conscious moms but then the food brings in a lot of elderly people, “Stone said.

As the restaurant owners get to know their customers, they’re able to personalize the Crestline Village experience. There’s one customer that comes to The Pantry and orders a juice customized just for her. “We make a Julie Juice, and Julie comes in here every day and grabs the same juice, so we have it for her at 12 o’clock,” Stone said.

The Julie Juice, made from two celery sticks, a handful of romaine, a quarter of a lemon, an apple and a handful of spinach, has become popular as more of Julie’s friends find out about it. Stone loves it because she’s gotten to know Julie’s inner circle, figured out what they like and can now invest in them not only as customers but as people too.

Caring about people is what it’s all about for The Pantry. There’s great value in eating farm-to-table, and The Pantry is the face of the farm — a way to bring the farm to everyone in Crestline.

Right past the old drugstore and across the street from the mighty Crestline Clock Tower is another shop that cares greatly about its customers and the Crestline community.

Church Street Coffee & Books moved into an abandoned Starbucks a little more than two years ago. Since then, the store has been selling coffee, pastries and books to customers who have quickly become regulars. The specialty coffees and drinks are delicious, but it’s the cookies that keep customers coming back for more. The best seller is the break-up cookie, which is a chocolate chip cookie with sea salt baked on top.

There’s a loft upstairs perfect for students who need to study and a patio outside with a view of the clock tower as well as ample seating inside. It’s hard to find a time of day when regular customers aren’t visiting with the staff because at Church Street, there’s no such thing as “just a customer.” Everyone is treated like family.

One of the co-owners of Church Street Coffee & Books, Cal Morris, doesn’t have any big dreams for future expansion. Instead, his dream is to be a welcoming place for the community.

“Honestly, I think we are living our dream. Our dream is here,” Morris said.

And that dream of community in Crestline Village seems to be shared by every shop owner. Who doesn’t want to shop, eat and spend their afternoons playing chess or having a picnic in a place that feels like home?

There are more than 50 shops and businesses that attract people to Crestline including ice cream parlors, photography studios, Mexican and Southern cooking restaurants, gas stations, clothing stores and so much more. Crestline Village offers it all!

The brick buildings, delicious food and welcoming stores will surely draw you into this quaint town, but the people of Crestline Village will always be what makes you want to stay.

Kara Young: a singer who doesn’t want to be famous

KaraYoungCDAlbum

Kara Young poses for her new CD cover.

She has been singing for years and recently debuted her new CD, yet Kara Young has no desire to become famous.

Growing up in a family that sings together as a hobby, Young has always considered music to be part of her life. “I always tell people I started singing in the womb, but I really don’t remember the exact time I started singing,” Young said.

She began taking guitar lessons in eighth grade and was soon asked to lead worship for an event in her hometown of Tupelo, Miss. “I definitely loved the Lord and I loved music, so it made sense, but I didn’t really know what I was doing at first,” Young said.

However, that changed the summer before her tenth grade year of high school when she was asked to lead worship regularly for her church youth group. “I felt very inadequate,” she said. Recognizing that it was much more than simply singing, she thought other people had more talents than she did and would be better equipped.

“Knowing how to follow the Spirit and lead a congregation is so much more than performing a concert,” Young said. Even with all of these doubts, she felt called to lead and told her youth pastor, “I don’t want to, but I will.” Since then, multiple doors have opened and Young has been given the opportunity to sing for thousands of people.

During her senior year of high school she debuted an EP called “Take A Stand” with five original songs and one hymn. In the fall of 2013 she released her first full-length album titled “Familiarity”, which she describes as chapter two of her story. The songs on her new album follow her journey as she leaves home, begins life as a student at Samford University, struggles with picking a major and each new season that comes along the way.

Although she now has two CDs out and leads worship regularly, her goal has remained the same through the entire process.

“Ultimately, my goal is not to be a famous Christian singer,” Young said. “My goal is not to be well-known.” Instead, her “main goal is to open my heart and use the light of Jesus and allow myself to be a vessel for Him to reach others and lead others to a state of worship through the gifts He has given me.”

As she continues to take opportunities to sing, her mind-set remains that her talent is a gift. “It’s not about performing and it’s not about the songs and the vocals. He gave me a heart and a passion for leading the Body of Christ in a state of worship through the gift of music.”

Young currently works at a church in Birmingham by leading retreats and worship services on the weekend. She founded Let It Shine Ministries and continues to write and sing music while working through her ministry.

Kara Young’s music is available on iTunes and CDBaby. To keep up with her, visit her Facebook page.

By Kaitlyn Bouchillon

Photography by Elizabeth Bacon

Samford’s servant leader

Samford Athletics Director Martin Newton

Several hundred student-athletes and coaches, all in the same gym, waited to hear what their new athletic director had to say. Martin Newton began to speak of his plans and dreams, giving birth to a
new era of Samford athletics.

“I had been on the job for about a week,” Newton says. “They had no idea who I was and I had no idea who they were. I just remember the excitement of going into that gym and feeling that I can’t wait to
get to know all these people.”

Almost two years later, Newton presides over a program that has already produced five Southern Conference tournament champions under his watch.

Samford’s football team finished with its best record since 2003 and the men’s basketball team tied its best conference record in five SoCon seasons under first-year head coach Bennie Seltzer.

“Martin has a vision,” Seltzer says. “We’re trying to do something special here at Samford. Why not be one of the top schools in our region? That’s the vision that we both share.”

Newton believes that his vision and the recent success of Samford’s athletic department provide a
good impression on Samford’s overall image.

“When we win and we do it the right way we can help this university grow,” Newton says. “The foundation was there. All I’ve done is stepped in and changed the culture to not accept mediocrity.”

Newton plans on changing that culture in the best way he knows how, through interaction with other people and building community. He lives out Proverbs 27:17 in his life and in his work.

“For us to build what we want to build at this university, we can’t do it alone,” Newton says. “We’ve got to get others involved and sharpen one another. Christ was such a servant leader, and that’s what I’ve tried to bring into this. The only way to do that is to work with and sharpen other people.”

Samford Athletics Director Martin Newton

Photos by Clayton Hurdle

Thursday night worship at the Dreamcenter

Healing a Broken City

Serve Team shirt

The Village’s executive office is located on 24 Street South in downtown Birmingham. No, it’s not a new housing development, but rather an organization seeking to help develop life in downtown Birmingham. This office is not on the top floor of a high rise, it’s in an old mechanic’s garage and the top executive is wearing jeans. However, the work done at The Village by Andy Jenkins and his fellow laborers is perhaps the most important work being done in Birmingham today.

A New Type of Ministry

“There’s this big need of poverty when you look at downtown. All the building and all of the growth that they’re touting with the Railroad Park and you’ve got all these other needs. For all the hype that you see, there’s a lot of despair and need down here as well,” Jenkins said.“The idea of going on mission is that you live the gospel and as you live the gospel people are redeemed and the church emerges from that,” Jenkins said. “When you’re downtown and you have a church that’s all white and all middle class, then you didn’t do the gospel.”Jenkins saw needs in downtown Birmingham that were not being addressed by the church where he was serving or by the city government.

The despair Jenkins saw combined with the lack of the church’s reflection of downtown Birmingham’s culture created a desire to build a village for God.

“The Village basically was the result of a week that I spent really praying and fasting about what to actually do, not just theoretically, what to actually do,” Jenkins said.

Andy Jenkins and two of his children.

Loving and Serving

The passion emanating from Jenkins’ words as he describes what led to his founding of The Village three years ago hits a few nerves. With an estimated 2,400 homeless persons in the city, 1,000 teenagers aging out of the foster care system yearly and 2,000 prisoners rejoining society each year in Jefferson County alone, Jenkins’ passion is necessary.

“There’s a big vacuum down here of the hope of the gospel, and if the church is the hope of the world then there should be a strong force of the church downtown and there’s rumblings of it,” Jenkins said. “But it’s not hit what it could be.”

The Village helps cause those rumblings through their various programs.

The unique part about their approach to serving the lost and broken in Birmingham is The Village’s year-long holistic growth track that helps residents stay focused and goal oriented as they work toward becoming whole persons once more.

The growth track encompasses four core values: identity, relationships, directions and purpose.  Tasks involved within the growth track cover the necessities like obtaining basic forms of identification and building a budget to maintaining sobriety and attending weekly worship services.

Jonette Moore

Jonette Moore, a former resident, who now serves as coordinator of the women’s programs and all transportation services at The Village, attributes her growth and wholeness to the foundation of faith on which the program is built.

“I was kind of angry at first, because I really wanted to go home, but God just kind of spoke to me and told me to be still,” Moore said. “So I did that and just started listening in class, started listening at church and started growing and could feel him working again in my life.”

Moore said she saw herself grow during her eight months at The Village, and her family notices the change.

“I’ve learned over the years to not try to convince anyone that I’ve changed or that it’s different this time and I didn’t do that this time. I just let it be what it is. And my family can see the difference, and my mom is like ‘Are you my child?’ because things I normally would have blown up about, I don’t,” Moore said. “So she can see the difference and that’s how I know it’s working. And it’s still working.”

Moore’s successful completion of the growth track shows residents that healing and change are possible because of her visible example.

“It helps to have that in my history and be able to see both sides of it, and at the same time, it makes it a lot easier for them to open up to me,” Moore said.

Moore said that the foundation of faith on which the program is built influences each step of the growth track. And rather than “beating them over the head with the Bible,” it helps residents re-align their life.

“We pray that when they complete this that they are ready to face life on life’s terms.”

A Life Restoration Thing

The Village’s mission of loving and serving the city of Birmingham manifests itself in their work.

Downtown Birmingham needs an injection of love and service rather than grass, paint or new buildings. Jenkins sees a negative trend in the focus on the “stuff and things” that don’t give healing to the broken.

“We don’t really need a park and trees if everybody is broken and can’t go,” Jenkins said.

That is where The Village’s mission comes in. Downtown needs long-term investment to heal the broken people.

Thursday night worship at the Dreamcenter

A partner of The Village, The Dreamcenter in Woodlawn, is one of those longterm investments. Thursday evenings at the Dreamcenter are part of The Village’s growth track. Residents fellowship over hot-off-the-grill hot dogs and then take part in a worship service led by Church of the Highlands staff and Jenkins’ heartfelt sermon.

A New Kind of Mall

An idea was hatched in March 2010 that has the potential to change the face of not only The Village, but all faith-based non-profits in Birmingham. After touring the former Carraway Hospital complex, The Village staff began imagining an expansion that would put The Village and a multitude of other faith-based non-profits under the same roof.

“So what you’ve created is a model where anybody can walk in the front door and any need that anybody has, you can meet that in the name of Christ by some ministry that’s there,” Jenkins said.

In 11 floors, the vision for the Carraway Hospital creates a “ministry mall” for any hurting or broken person.

Each floor serves a specific function that continues what The Village does today, such as getting men and women off of the streets and into a stable living environment. Services would expand to housing a floor for a state-certified drug-rehabilitation facility as well as creating new programs for interns, short-term mission trips and providing space for 100 other Christ-centered, non-profit organizations.

“The idea was be a small city within a bigger city that loves, serves and blesses the bigger city, not in opposition to it, but for it,” Jenkins said. “It’s a life restoration thing, you want to find broken people and heal those people.”

The Carraway project now awaits approval from the Birmingham City Council, before the project can begin. Despite city politics, The Village continues its mission to love and serve downtown Birmingham.